Industry News

Going Green

This earth-friendly site offers helpful tips and practices you can implement in your household, school, or community to save our planet.

Green Plants for Green BuildingsLearn how Green Plants for Green Buildings are essential to creating and maintaining a healthy and profitable environment. This is YOUR resource. We invite you to explore the research, press & available tools. Discover for yourself how to optimize nature’s technology!

What is Green Plants for Green Buildings (GPGB)
GPGB (formerly Plants at Work) is a national information campaign working in conjunction with the industry to inform professionals and the public about the numerous benefits of interior plants.

Plants in the workplace offer more than aesthetic value. In fact, studies have shown they help reduce stress, enhance employee attitudes, increase productivity, and improve air quality.

Green Plants for Green Buildings is committed to communicating this message to facility and property managers, building owners and human resource executives across the country.

A primary sponsor of GPGB is the Professional Landcare Network (PLANET), formerly known as the Associated Landscape Contractors of America (ALCA).

How GPGB Was Created

Created in October 1998, GPGB (formerly Plants at Work) was the dream of several industry professionals, who recognized the threats and the opportunities within the green industry. The creation of GPGB marked the beginning of the first national education campaign designed to educate professionals and the public about the benefits of interior plants in the workplace.

Learn More »


Plants for People

Plants for People
Plants for People is an international initiative, spreading knowledge of the benefits of plants in a working environment. Plants for People initiates and supports international research projects, collects and publicises relevant study results and communicates these results at symposiums and workshops. Throughout the last ten years, the results of various studies have shown that plants can decompose large quantities of harmful substances, improve the indoor air by increasing the air humidity, reduce the quantity of dust and air-condition rooms – without any technical equipment. It is much more difficult to prove the psychological effect of indoor plants, although people spontaneously confirm: Plants in offices improve the subjective well-being and the attitude towards the place of work, they reduce the stress symptoms, increase productivity and there are less health problems. The introduction of plants in offices or at places of work does not only have an inward effect, it also demonstrates an ecological attitude.


Green Plants for Green Buildings

Green Plants for Green BuildingsLearn how Green Plants for Green Buildings are essential to creating and maintaining a healthy and profitable environment. This is YOUR resource. We invite you to explore the research, press & available tools. Discover for yourself how to optimize nature’s technology!

What is Green Plants for Green Buildings (GPGB)

GPGB (formerly Plants at Work) is a national information campaign working in conjunction with the industry to inform professionals and the public about the numerous benefits of interior plants.

Plants in the workplace offer more than aesthetic value. In fact, studies have shown they help reduce stress, enhance employee attitudes, increase productivity, and improve air quality.

Green Plants for Green Buildings is committed to communicating this message to facility and property managers, building owners and human resource executives across the country.

A primary sponsor of GPGB is the Professional Landcare Network (PLANET), formerly known as the Associated Landscape Contractors of America (ALCA).

How GPGB Was Created

Created in October 1998, GPGB (formerly Plants at Work) was the dream of several industry professionals, who recognized the threats and the opportunities within the green industry. The creation of GPGB marked the beginning of the first national education campaign designed to educate professionals and the public about the benefits of interior plants in the workplace.

Learn More »


Plantscape Institute of America

Plantscape Institute of AmericaThe Plantscape Institute of America (PIA) is a community of experts who design, install, and maintain plants in building environments.

PIA and its members are dedicated to bringing nature to all spaces occupied by people by using living plants to enhance human well-being.

PIA produces PIA Seminars for Plantscapers, a series of regional educational seminars held throughout the year, the International Plantscape Awards by PIA, and the PIA annual trade show and conference.

Learn More »


Articles worth reading:

Plants Cleanse the Air and Combat ‘Sick Building Syndrome’

The problem is large and growing. Contemporary buildings are sealed tightly to increase HVAC efficiency. Inside those sealed environments, man-made articles such as paints, plastics, insulation, plywood, carpets, synthetic fabrics, and detergents omit up to 300 harmful pollutants. NASA-funded studies directed by Dr. B.C. Wolverton, a 20-year veteran in horticultural research, proved that the plants commonly used in interior plantscaping cleanse the air of many harmful pollutants such as formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene. Golden pothos, philodendron, and bamboo palms are particularly effective in cleansing the air of formaldehyde. Spathiphyllum (peace lily), dracena warneckei, and dracena “Janet Craig” remove quantities of benzene, such as that from tobacco smoke. Marginata, warneckei, and spathiphyllum work well in removing trichloroethylene. The Plants for Clean Air Council recommends one potted plant for each 100 square feet of floor space.

This information was provided by Barb Helfman, CLP, TOPsiders, Inc., Cincinnati, OH

Office Plants Are Keeping You Healthy

HERNDON, VA—Did you know that you are more likely to develop a cold or catch the flu when the humidity in your home or office is too low? You are also more vulnerable to disease and illness if the humidity is too high. The answer to these problems will probably surprise you…interior plants actually stabilize the humidity, making you and the environment healthier.

Interior plants are vital to maintaining the approved human comfort range for relative humidity in offices. A study conducted by Virginia Lohr, Ph. D., at Washington State University determined that when plants were placed in offices, the relative humidity increased significantly and actually stabilized at the recommended range of 30 to 60 percent. In the absence of plants, the relative humidity in offices was slightly below the recommended range for human comfort and health.

The relative humidity of air inside office buildings is often found to be extremely low, especially in the winter when buildings are being heated. This occurs because relative humidity drops as air is heated if no supplemental moisture is added. Relative humidity is defined as the amount of moisture in air and is expressed as a percentage of the maximum amount the air is capable of holding. Warm air can hold more water than cooler air.

Plants contributed to interior humidity by adding moisture to the air through transpiration and secondarily through evaporation from growing media and drainage dish surfaces. The relative humidity in the offices stabilized because plants naturally reduced their levels of transpiration when relative humidity was high and increased the rate of transpiration when lower relative humidities were present. The study documented that plants did not contribute excessive amounts of moisture to any of the interior spaces studied.

Researchers recorded the relative humidity of office space in a building with a central, forced air system in the presence and absence of plants. Measurements were taken during four consecutive winter months. Once each week, plants were added or removed as required. Humidity and temperature were recorded every six hours. A variety of plant species were used. Air exchange rates were estimated to average one to two air changes per hour.

Relative humidity inside buildings should be maintained to prevent damage or harm caused by high or low levels of moisture. Buildings are routinely designed to remove humidity by venting interior air to the outside. Without the exchange of air, interior relative humidity would rise to saturation because there are many sources of moisture in most buildings: people release moisture through their skin and as they breathe, and moisture may be emitted from cooking and washing.

source: www.alca.org